The Benefits of Community

It’s been a while. This is my first post for Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2021, but I promise I’ve been busy in the laboratory. In the past two months, I’ve submitted grant applications to Breast Cancer Alliance, METAvivor, and Department of Defense CDMRP Breast Cancer Research Program. The first two are foundations that fund novel research projects, supporting scientists like me so we can take a chance on new projects that are higher risk/high reward and generate preliminary data for larger funding proposals. DOD supports larger research projects at both early (Breakthrough Level 1) and later (Breakthrough Level 2) stages. Fingers and toes crossed for grant funding! If you’re looking for organizations to support, I highly recommend Breast Cancer Alliance and METAvivor.

Photo credit Deposit Photos.

For this post, I’d like to highlight some survivor communities that have helped me and continue to help me, and to encourage patients and survivors to reach out for support. Cancer made me feel powerless. Sure, I was taking care of myself and following instructions from my surgeons, oncologist, and other providers, but they were doing things to me and for me – cutting out the cancer, managing my followup therapies, monitoring me to make sure the cancer wasn’t back, but I felt like I wasn’t (or couldn’t) do anything. That’s part of the reason I wrote Talking To My Tatas and why I started this blog. I needed to DO something.

I also needed to know I wasn’t alone. Enter other breast cancer patients and survivors. These people are some of the most generous human beings, providing support, practical advice, sharing their stories, and giving lots and lots of love to people who join this club we never wanted to be a part of but is filled with survivors in every sense of the word.

Where can you find support? Plenty of places! The Internet can be a terrible and wonderful place, and in the case of support for cancer patients and survivors, it can be a lifeline. Here are some survivor communities who’ve helped see me through on Facebook:

Breast Cancer Straight Talk

This is a large FB group dedicated to shared experiences and full of practical advice! I went to them when I was preparing for my mastectomy and I got a TON of tips for what to expect, what to stock up on (soft cotton camis and cardigans with pockets for surgical drains, pillows, etc.). Need advice from folks who’ve been there? Need to vent? Looking for hope? A safe place to express yourself? This is a great one!

Finding Humor After Breast Cancer

Laughter is one of the best weapons we have when it comes to cancer, and you’ll get plenty of laughs from this group. Lots of boob humor. Check them out!

American Cancer Society

Want to know about the latest research? Looking to connect with survivors and get involved in advocacy, or do you need information on resources from financial to physical and mental health? This group is a great place to start.

Breast Cancer Atheist Support Group

Looking for a support community that welcomes patients and survivors outside of majority faith communities? This one is super helpful and supportive!

Not big on social media? Ask about support groups available through your medical center. Check out your local Gilda’s Club – just be sure to follow safety guidelines for Covid-19. Need a support community for African American breast cancer patients and survivors? Check out Sisters Network – they provide a space for African American breast cancer patients to meet, bond, and receive support during treatments. Similar organizations tailored to the unique needs and experiences of other communities of color include: The Latino Cancer Institute, The American Indian Cancer Foundation, and The Asian American Cancer Support Network. Support for LGBTQIA+ cancer patients, including a directory for LGBT-friendly cancer treatment facilities, can be found at The National LGBT Cancer Network.

No matter your background, culture, or identity, you don’t have to go it alone when it comes to breast cancer. I encourage you to find your support network and lean on them. And, when you’re ready, be a part of that community and give your support to someone in need.

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