Staying Mentally, Physically, and Spiritually Healthy During Shelter-At-Home

As much of America (not enough, but we’re getting there) and the world at large continue to shelter-at-home, self (or mandatory) quarantine, and take other measures to flatten the Covid-19 curve (In epidemiology, the curve refers to the projected number of new cases over a period of time), we’re facing many new challenges. We’re worried about our finances, job security, food security and the supply chain, medical supplies, and the economy, of course. We’re worried about our families, friends, communities, and the long-term impact of this pandemic. We’re worried about our childrens’ education, which like most of the rest of societal norms, has been put on hold. We’re worried about how and when the pandemic will end, and what we can do to prepare for the next one.

There will be a next pandemic. It’s inevitable.

For many of us who are classified as non-essential workers, we have more time to worry as we remain isolated from friends, family, and other social supports. It’s the perfect storm for anxiety and depression to thrive, and it’s a problem. Maintaining mental well-being, as well as physical and spiritual, can be a struggle in these difficult times. But it is essential if all of us are going to get through this.

I’m fortunate to have access to Telehealth services – hell, let’s be real: I’m fortunate to have access to healthcare and coverage in this nation, something we should ALL HAVE. I’ve been receiving tips from my wonderful therapist (and my son’s therapist, too), and I’d love to share this advice with all y’all. I hope it helps.

Keep a Regular Schedule

Link to source.

Keeping a routine is beneficial for health and well-being. You don’t have to be super rigid about it – flexibility is key. For us, weekdays consist of a regular wakeup time at 8:00 a.m., a loose homeschool schedule, regular healthy meals, free time in the evening, and a regular bedtime. Small steps, but they are sanity savers in uncertain times. We don’t know what’s coming tomorrow in the wider world, but we know what we need to do for the hours in the day. This is especially good for children.

Tune Out The Noise – News and Social Media

Link to source.

The media is a double-edged sword and has been for a long time. It’s important to keep abreast of local, national, and international news in a time of crisis, but too much apocalyptic doomsday speculation, news of tragedy, talking heads arguing back and forth, and watching our leaders at their worst isn’t healthy. Social media is much the same. Take a break. My therapist suggested having a designated 30 minute to 1 hour slot for checking in with the news and “unplugging” for the rest of the day. News is one thing, but I’m a social media addict! I love FaceBook, Twitter, and Insta, and these tools can be useful in terms of feeling connected with people during the isolation period. But avoid fights, don’t use social media as a gateway for too much bad news coverage to seep in, and don’t fall into the rabbit hole of 3 hours in TikTok land. That’s just not healthy.

Healthy Eating and Exercise – Essentials of Self-Care

Link to source.

This one’s been a challenge for me – eating healthy is hard when you love to bake and have time. But there are no downsides to healthy eating and exercise, and many of us have time now! The Internet is full of amazing recipes, which is especially useful when you’re working with a limited supply of ingredients. Check out this site for tools to help you plan meals based on what’s in your fridge and pantry. If you’re having trouble feeding yourself or your family, check with your school system (MNPS is continuing weekday meal service for students and families), food banks (find one near you here), and for state and local programs in your area.

For exercise, something as simple as stretches, sit ups, jumping jacks, and leg lifts are always a good choice. I’m working on strength and flexibility to manage side effects of tamoxifen and prepare for my mastectomy, so yoga is my go-to. Yoga with Adrienne is my online go-to. Walking through your neighborhood (while maintaining social distancing) is another great option, as is yard work, housework, and games like Just Dance and video game fitness options. Move your body several times a day in whatever way works for you.

Need to unwind? Warm baths and showers with extra pampering time are fantastic. Deep condition your hair, massage your scalp, practice mindfulness as you take care of your body. Whatever spiritual path you follow, rituals work to calm, heal, and comfort in difficult times. Use them, but do it safely. No mass gatherings!

Find Connections When and Where You Can

Remember when I said to avoid social media? While avoiding the negativity on social media is a great thing, using it as a tool to connect with people you cannot see in person is a beautiful thing. I’m appreciating all of the amazing talents on display in FaceBook, Twitter, and Insta videos, which is even more fun with people I know! Have an IM chat. Call a friend or family member. Use Zoom, Skype, or FaceTime if you’re so inclined and are willing to put on a bra (pants optional). Human connection, even for introverts like me, is essential.

You might consider creating content to share during quarantine. I’ve done my part with this dramatic reading of “Does It Fart” to educate and entertain the public with the subject of animal flatulence.

Don’t Drink, Sleep, or Work Too Much: Moderation

It’s tempting to use this shelter-at-home thing as an excuse to over indulge. If you’re drinking or using drugs to self-medicate, though, please stop! You’re risking your life, health, and emergency medical services are already strained due to the pandemic. Get help! You are important, you matter, and we can’t lose you!

Getting rest is a good thing, but too much sleep isn’t healthy. See above – keep a routine, including a normal sleep routine, for health and sanity.

It’s tempting to use this time to dig deep into work-related projects, as many of us feel the pressure to catch up, not get behind, and are worried about career and job security in this difficult time. But, as noted above, routine is key. Work, take regular breaks, and STOP each day. This is therapist-recommended!

Have fun and Be Weird

My photo – I’m the soure!

You’re at home with family, pets, or possibly on your own.

Embrace your weirdness and have fun with it!

In my house, we have Bob, the Halloween skeleton who we’ve decided is (a) not just for Halloween, (b) gender fluid, and (c) a being for all seasons. Bob likes to dress for the season, so he’s sporting one of my favorite sundresses, a lovely cap, and is striking a sassy pose with flowers. That’s my weird (one of them, anyway).

What’s yours?

Resources for pandemic: Ready.gov, Benefits.gov (resources for unemployment, healthcare coverage, food), GrantSpace.org (links to resources for bill pay assistance, grants, etc.)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s