Call to Action – Urge Congressional Representatives to Support Breast Cancer Screening and People Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer

Cancer is a great and terrible equalizer. It doesn’t care if you’re a Democrat, Republican, Independent, or if you support other political philosophies or are apolitical. Anyone can be diagnosed with cancer. For breast cancer, access to routine screening and diagnostic imaging is critical for early detection, accurate diagnosis, and receiving treatments in a timely fashion.

It can literally mean the difference between life and death.

Photo Source Deposit Photos

When breast cancer metastasizes, or spreads to other parts of the body, time is precious, and people living with metastatic breast cancer need all the financial and medical support they can get.

How can you help? There are two pieces of legislation in need of support and a federal program in desperate need of reauthorization:

Courtesy of Susan G. Komen
Photo Credit Deposit Photos

The first piece of legislation, the Access to Breast Cancer Diagnosis (ABCD) Act, will reduce out-of-pocket costs for diagnostic imaging for people with health insurance. While screening mammography is normally covered, additional imaging that’s needed when something suspicious or abnormal is spotted on a mammogram can become pricey. For each of my diagnoses (initial breast cancer diagnosis and diagnosis for residual disease), I required additional diagnostic mammography, diagnostic MRI, and diagnostic ultrasound. They were most DEFINITELY medically necessary to determine that the suspicious lesions on my mammography were indeed cancer – and for past follow-up diagnostic imaging, to determine that suspicious lesions were benign. This legislation will reduce the financial burden for diagnostic imaging that can be a barrier for early diagnosis.

The second piece of legislation, the Metastatic Breast Cancer Access to Care Act, would reduce wait times for receiving Social Security Disability Benefits and Medicare. Right now, the wait time for Medicare benefits for people living with metastatic breast cancer is 5 months, and the average wait for disability is 24 months. The five-year survival rate for stage 4 metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is 22 percent, and the median survival is three years (Reference). As one legislative staffer noted when I spoke with him about the issue and the wait times, “That’s cruel.” It is. People living with MBC need medical care coverage and financial support for themselves and their families. Legislation waiving wait times for ALS and end-stage kidney disease passed, setting a precedent for this important legislation supporting MBC.

Finally, reauthorization of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, will preserve and expand access to screening for un- and under-insured American. Early detection increases a patient’s chances of survival, so this life-saving program needs your support.

Please help these Bills become Law!

Please contact your Senators and Congressional Representative and urge them to co-sponsor and/or support these three key pieces of legislation. Feel free to copy and paste information from this blog post or use it as a script in a phone call.

Fundraising for Tanisha

Tanisha Jones MBC & Renal Failure Fund

I’ve met and admired many survivor sisters over the years. After my diagnosis, they held me in their arms and lifted me up so I didn’t have to face breast cancer alone. Before I was diagnosed, I got to know a really cool woman named Tanisha Jones. We were represented by the same literary agency at the time, writing romance and urban fantasy* and trying to break into the fiction publishing world in a big way.

*Side note: If you’re a fan of Anne Rice and J.R. Ward, TREAT YOURSELF to Tanisha’s The Fallen Series. This exciting series is full of vampires, Fae, Weres, demons, and other supernatural beings hiding in plain sight in New Orleans. Throw in a hot homicide detective with some supernatural abilities of his own and you’ve got one helluva story!

Like me, Tanisha works in academics (one of her many jobs). She also has a daughter, just a little bit older than mine. She has hopes, dreams, highs, lows, a wicked sense of humor and a drive and work ethic to rival any I’ve seen in my almost 48 years on the planet.

Like me, she has breast cancer. Unlike me, she’s living with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). While there is no cure, she hasn’t allowed MBC to define her life or steal her dreams. She’s still writing – she published Unbound, Book 3 in The Fallen series, this month. She’s still raising her daughter. Due to health issues related to MBC, she isn’t working at the moment but she’s worked since her diagnosis in 2016.

Because America is still balking at the idea that healthcare is a human right rather than a privilege reserved only for the white and wealthy (and healthy), like many Americans, Tanisha is struggling financially due to the cost of her cancer care. I could write an entire rage post on the topics of American healthcare’s failures that include the real possibility of financial ruin, disparities in access and care, and the lack of healthcare equality and equity that is still VERY much a problem in 2020 in this country, and I will.

But right now, what matters is helping my friend who’s struggling with breast cancer.

Tanisha’s family also has a GoFundMe initiative (you know, the largest healthcare “plan” in the United States) to help her. Click here to donate what you can. It helps. It matters.

I have taken the extra book royalties I earned in November plus a small windfall that came to me at just the right time to support Tanisha. I can think of no better person in whom to invest.